Former Students

profile photo. Skoretz, StaceyStacey Skoretz, MSc, PhD

Dr. Skoretz is a medical Speech-Language Pathologist and Assistant Professor (tenure-track) with the School of Audiology and Speech Sciences in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver. She is also Assistant Clinical Professor with the Department of Critical Care in the Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. She completed her doctoral training at the University of Toronto under the supervision of Dr. Rosemary Martino in 2015. Her research program focuses on artificial airways and their impact on upper airway physiology with an emphasis on swallowing function following cardiovascular surgery, organ transplantation and critical illness. She was awarded the Dysphagia Research Society New Investigator Award in 2012. For her entire career she has and continues to work as a clinician in quaternary-level cardiovascular, neuroscience and critical care units. This guides her work in the advancement of evidence-based practice in the field of swallowing and its disorders. She has been an invited speaker on many occasions and lecturer at both the University of Alberta and the University of Toronto. In addition to conducting research in both British Columbia and Alberta, she teaches graduate-level courses in the areas of swallowing and motor speech at UBC-Vancouver.

 

profile photo. Heather Flowers - close upHeather Flowers, MHSc, PhD

Dr. Flowers is a Speech-Language Pathologist with a prior background in education and linguistics. She completed her clinical training at the University of Toronto in the Master of Health Science program. She embarked on PhD studies in the swallowing laboratory with a view to identify the co-occurrence of multiple impairments after stroke. Through her PhD research, she demonstrated the high frequency and co-occurrence of dysphagia, dysarthria, and aphasia after ischemic stroke. As part of this work, she elucidated clinical and brain-based predictors of the three impairments. The clinical objectives of her work were to promote awareness of the need for routine swallowing and communication evaluations early after stroke onset, leading to sustained management for stroke survivors. In the future, Dr. Flowers will conduct postdoctoral research aimed at implementing rapid, early aphasia screening in stroke patients. Her goal is to contribute to the development of internationally-aligned clinical paradigms for the identification and management of aphasia.

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